Lady Be Good

Lady Be Good

The Story of the WWII bomber, Lady Be Good, and her crew.  Lower level meeting room.
Thursday, August 17 at 6:30 p.m.

Local historian Dick Campbell tells the story of the American Liberator bomber, Lady Be Good, which vanished into the night on April 4, 1943. Discovery of the downed aircraft 15 years later uncovered evidence of the crew’s desperate and unsuccessful attempts to survive in the aftermath.
Dick Campbell
On April 4, 1943, a World War II American B-24D Liberator bomber, nicknamed ‘Lady Be Good’, vanished into the night while returning to her airbase at Soluch, Libya, following a mission to Naples, Italy. All attempts to find the aircraft and her crew proved unsuccessful, and they became just one more casualty of the war. Fifteen years later, oil geologists, flying over the Libyan Desert, spotted the bomber’s well-preserved remains from the air some 440 miles southeast of Soluch. Eventually, through many months of exploration, they located the remains of eight of the nine crewmembers and evidence of their desperate attempt to survive in the forbidding desert environment, where temperatures rose to 130 degrees during the day and dropped to almost freezing at night. This is a story of one of the most extraordinary combat incidents of World War II and one of the most indomitable and futile episodes of desert survival.

Lower level meeting room.